Paul E. Lovejoy

A leading proponent of revisionist interpretations of the history of the African diaspora, he is the founding Director of the Harriet Tubman Institute and editor of the Harriet Tubman Series on the African Diaspora with Africa World Press.

His theoretical approach places Africa at the center of intellectual discourse. His contributions to the UNESCO include service on the International Scientific Committee of the UNESCO Slave Route Project (1996-2012), his continued involvement as co-editor of the on-line series of essays by committee members, and a co-editor of the UNESCO General History of Africa, vol. 10, on Global Africa.

Harriet Tubman Series

As General Editor of the Harriet Tubman Series on the African Diaspora, Africa World Press, Lovejoy has overseen the publication of 35 volumes on a wide range of topics pertaining to Africa and the African diaspora. The Series include numerous edited volumes that have allowed the publication of the research findings from countries in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean as well as Europe and North America. The Series has made accessible the work of scholars whose research has had to be translated from Portuguese, Spanish or French, thereby confronting the linguistic barrier that sometimes isolated scholars. Several of the volumes are outputs of the SSHRC funded MCRI project on slavery, memory, citizenship, for which Lovejoy served as Principal Investigator.

UNESCO Slave Route Project

As a member of the UNESCO Slave Route Project, Lovejoy presented his co-edited SSHRC-supported volume, The Transatlantic Slave Trade and Slavery: New Directions in Teaching and Learning (Harriet Tubman Series) to the Executive Committee of UNESCO in Paris and to the United Nations in New York as an example of how African cultural contributions have been marginalized in teaching.

SHADD
Studies in History of the African Diaspora – Documents

As a member of the UNESCO Slave Route Project, from 1996 to 2012, Lovejoy presided over numerous conferences and workshops to advance the aims of the UNESCO initiative to “break the chains of silence” that have plagued an understanding of the slavery past and its global impact.  He presented his co-edited SSHRC-supported volume, The Transatlantic Slave Trade and Slavery: New Directions in Teaching and Learning (Harriet Tubman Series) to the Executive Committee of UNESCO in Paris and at a special forum at the United Nations in New York as part of an international effort to challenge educators to revise how African history and slavery are taught and why African cultural contributions have to be emphasized in education.

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